Category Archives: Global Patterns

Shades of autumn at Zara Home

Get set for autumn at Zara Home: you’ll find an abundance of animal prints, balanced with textured plains:

Zarah Home bedlinen via findthedetails.com

fringing, chevrons and feathers….

Zara Home bedlinen via findthedetails.com

White and creams brought to life with oranges, rusts, and reds:

Zara Home tableware via findthedetails.com

Navajo-style stripes:

Zara Home throw and blanket via findthedetails.com

And lots of metals, such as this mirrored table set… This appeals, as it’s sold as a set of three tables, yet works just as well as one single console or side table:

Zara home table via findthedetails.com

And in the bathroom, the textiles and accessories are, as always, a strength: this autumn you’ll find pared down versions of their wilder patterns in softer tones, plus roughly textured baskets, stools and storage:

Zara Home bathroom accessories via findthedetails

[all images, Zara Home]

All just in, at Zara Home. Happy September! Jx

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For lovers of craft, indigo and textiles: an exhibition

If these words inspire you: textiles, crafts, traditional and inherited skills, and totally dreamy indigo blues patched over and over: then don’t miss the Boro: Threads of Life exhibition at the East Wing Galleries of Somerset House this April.

Focusing on the ancient Japanese textile tradition of Boro, which means ‘rags’ in English, the textile exhibits on display include bedcovers and clothes made by the poor, rural population of Japan who pieced and patched old pieces of discarded clothing onto and into new items, with fisherman’s jackets morphing into futon covers and on and on, as the pieces were passed down through families and generations.

With their beautiful colours, these humble works of art prompt the viewers to consider the act of ‘mending’: could it be considered an old-fashioned skill? Or, as we continue to embrace traditional crafts at home; and are more aware of the damage caused by excess waste (and/or simply feel the pinch financially) is it becoming more current to embrace repairs, so we can keep our possessions for longer?

Boro exhibition at Somerset House via findthedetails.com

Boro: Threads of Life, 2-26 April, free admission, Somerset House.

Located just off The Strand, Somerset House has to be one of the most hard-working arts and cultural venues in London; changing with the seasons, you’ll discover it hosting al fresco music gigs and giant cinema screens; a multitude of fountains; the latests frocks (it’s home to London Fashion Week) or a beautiful ice rink….

From this….

Somerset House via findthedetails.com somerset house via findthedetails.com

To this….:

Somerset house via findthedetails.com Somerset House via findthedetails.comfindthedetails.com

Somerset House via findthedetails.com

[images, Somerset House

The line up of their Summer Series of gigs (10-20 July) has just been announced: tickets go on sale this Friday 21 March, with the cinema screenings to follow later in the summer. To to learn more about the architecture, join their free guided tours (every Thursday and Saturday), taking in the Tudor and Georgian history to the modern-day, including the new Miles Stair created by Eva Jiricna. Enjoy! Jx

Revealed: Designs of the Year 2014: Design Museum / Makoko Floating School

Today The Design Museum  announced their nominations for the Design of the Year 2014 and one of the most innovative architecture designs has to be the Makoko Floating School, which is located in a lagoon in the heart of the city of Lagos, Nigeria. Designed by architecture / design practice NLE in collaboration with Makoko Waterfront Community (the area is described as being similar in functionality, if not looks, to Venice), the floating structure takes into account the community’s needs (for a school and social space) and the physical demands of their environment: increasing tropical rainfall and an increasingly urbanised population.

Lead by architect Kunle Adeyemi, this prototype building is sustainable, ecological and alternative: two classrooms above and a play area below ensure the available space is used thoughtfully:

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find the details / Makoko floating school / courtesy NLE architecturefind the details / Makoko floating school, courtesy NLE

[images courtesy of NLE, Iwan Baan]

Designs of the Year brings together 76 cutting edge, innovative and talented creations, with the best in world-wide architecture, fashion, product and digital design and more on show at the exhibition, which opens on 26 March (until 25 August) at the Design Museum on Shad Thames, London SE1. Head to the show and whilst there, vote for your favourite design; but if you can’t make it in person, the online Social Vote platform gives you a chance to have your say. On Twitter, follow #designsoftheyear and @designmuseum for current conversations.

Help create the ultimate street art: painting a favela

Dutch artists Haas & Hahn are currently campaigning to raise funds for their latest art collaboration: to transform an entire favela in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with paint. Previously, they’ve worked with members of the local communities in the city to create street art on the walls and surfaces in parts of the city’s slums, and now they’re embarking on their most ambitious project yet.

Favela painting, findthedetails.com via designboom

An impression of how the finished favela will look, above, and how it looks today:

painting-an-entire-favela-in-rio-de-janeiro-designboom-03

Haas & Hahn’s first project, Boy with Kite (2006, Vila Cruzeiro), transformed this concrete neighbourhood:

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In 2010, the team worked on this colourful, ambitious project, a square in the Santa Marta community. Together with 25 locals who were trained and hired, the project took one month to complete, and has turned the area from a no-go zone to a tourist attraction:

favela painting, via findthedetails.com and designboom

favela painting via findthedetails.com and designboom favelapainting via findthedetails.com and designboom

[images: favela painting, designboom]

This latest huge, many-year project has it roots firmly in the community; from gaining approval for the painting (this means travelling through the favela, door to door), Haas & Hahn will work with local people, training them in the skills of plastering and painting, so creating neighourhood jobs alongside the creation of the public artwork. Basic human needs are also being addressed: simply by including plastering in the process, these handbuilt houses will have better longevity, temperature and moisture control. They’ll need headquarters, paint supplies, and huge amounts of funding, though their initial target is a restrained $100,000. 

Do use a click to visit Haas & Hahn’s Kickstarter and Favela Painting sites to help with the fundraising and view more of their work.

Lovers of blue and white, part IV: reinterpreting Japanese ceramics

Continuing my love of blue and white, (see previous posts here, here and here) I’ve just come across this new concept by Japanese design studio nendo, which has worked with Gen-emon to create a new series of porcelain tableware. Gen-omen is one of Japan’s most respected and long established traditional porcelain kilns, and nendo has taken some of their classic motifs, from small florals to geometric shapes; keeping the signature (and much loved) blue/white colour combination but playing with scale and the elements of the patterns to reintrpet the designs for today’s living:

nendo, designboomnendo, designboomnendo, designboomnendos-ceramic-play-collections-for-gen-emon-designboom-11nendo, designboomnendo, designboom

[all images, Designboom; products by nendo and gen-emon

By playing with the possibilities of pattern to plain; blue on white to white on blue, and using traditional motifs, the porcelain is beautiful both individually and as an eclectic group of several pieces. From plates to bowls, pots to spoons, this collection is definitely on my wish list!

Endless Stair: new installation at Tate Modern, Sept 2013

I’m still loving the summer months and definitely not wishing the warm temperatures away, but now I’m starting to think about September, when London goes completely design crazy.

Unmissable events include interior design trade shows, from the all-encompasssing Decorex to the cutting edge 100% Design and the London Design Festival which includes, amongst other events, Tent London in the east and Chelsea Design Quarter events in the west. The festival takes place at locations throughout the city from 13 September to 10 October, and this dramatic installation is one of the highlights:

endless stair

[Endless Stair, by dRMM with AHEC, image Cityscape via London Design Week]

The Endless Stair will be located just outside the Tate Modern, making this part of London’s South Bank even more worth a visit.

Constructed from hardwood (the structure is sponsored by the American Hardwood Export Council, and created by Architects dRMM) the M.C.Escher-inspired installation will be open to walk up and along during the day and can be admired, illuminated, at night time.

September’s looking to be a busy month, design-wise: I can’t wait.

Architecture News: Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, 2013: launch week

The Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, an annual temporary structure in the heart of central London, draws architecture experts and lovers from around the world during its brief life in Kensington Gardens. The temporary nature of the building is key: its impermanence allows its architects to create awe-inspiring spaces that challenge our perception of what, in fact, makes a building.

This year the architect in question is internationally highly-respected Sou Fujimoto, and he has chosen to create a mysterious, airy, confusing, awe-inspiring space made from thousands of latticed thin steel poles: 

Serpentine-SFA-3023 01A_serpentinegallery 01B_serpentinegallery Serpentine SFA 2773 Press page Serpentine-SFA-2740 Serpentine-SFA-2773

[Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, 2013, designed by Sou Fujimoto, Image credit Iwan Bann

These poles give the pavilion an ethereal semi-trasnparent appearance both on approach and within: it was important to his design that the pavilion is set within the leafy surroundings of Kensington Gardens. Fujimoto, describing his design work: ‘A new form of environment will be created, where the natural and man-made merge…. not soley architectural nor solely natural, but a unique meeting of the two’.

Visit the pavilion until 20 October, for more information about The Serpentine Gallery click here.