Category Archives: Sourced from Britain

Bring your walls to life; Peacock blue

Super-bright, colour-rich paint shades for interior walls are coming back into fashion, and one shade that keeps popping up on rooms and paint charts is peacock blue.

A hard colour to define, this blue is darker and more blue than aqua, greener than cobalt, yet not as green as turquoise, and just to confuse matters, it may vary in blueness from one paint chart to the next.

Researching, I discovered rooms painted in peacock blue have eclectic, sometimes traditional yet charming atmospheres. The shade is often used as a backdrop to display disparate collections of paintings, books, rugs and general accumulations of stuff…

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[images from top: The Bible of British Taste, Architectural DigestThe Decorista, Houzz.com]

Mini Moderns launched their paint collection in Autumn 2012, and these contemporary product designers included their version of this vibrant blue as one of the key shades in their new paint range.

Named Lido (so named after open air swimming pools rather than peacocks) their shot shows it’s possible to use the blue in a modern, clutter-free way:

Lido paint

Mini Moderns paint has impeccable green credentials: their matt emulsion is made from waste water-based paint which would otherwise have ended up in landfill or incineration: so with up to 90% recycled content, the paint is worthy of its full name, Environmentally Responsible Paint.

What do you think? Is this blue just too bright for you? Or do you welcome a return to bright shades as a way to easily, relatively cheaply, liven up our walls?

Beautiful fish; blue & white, part III

I read somewhere wherever you are in the UK, you are never more than 50 miles from the sea* and it may be this proximity to the seaside which provides our affinity with it, and likewise the inspiration for so many of our talented artists and designers.

Just as the with Sardine Run china from Jersey Pottery I wrote about here, these beautiful blue and white fish prints below share a love for the sea together with Japanese creative processes.

For her original artwork featuring locally caught Cornish fish, artist Susie Ray adapted an 18th-19th century technique called Gyotaku (fish rubbing) created by Japanese fishermen to visually record the fish they caught. Whilst the fishermen used ink and rice paper, Susie worked with oil paints and cotton cloth, so giving the paintings a wonderful textural depth that conveys a sense of movement and life.

Now she’s released beautiful prints of these originals, using pigment dyed light-fast inks and archival papers:

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All prints come in several sizes, and are produced, named and hand-signed by artist Susie Ray,  from The Padstow Mussel Company

If you haven’t discovered it yet, Cornwall-based The Padstow Mussel Company‘s shop and website itself is worth a look for its beautiful ceramics, photographs, artwork and tableware.

*(although according to this BBC article, it could differ between 45 and 70 miles depending on what your definition of ‘sea’ is….)