Tag Archives: architecture

Just in: Arkiv wallpapers by Sandberg

Combining both the best of both old and new design processes, Swedish wallpaper design house Sandberg has drawn on a wealth of archive material – both their own and sourced from Sweden’s rich architectural and design history – to create their first digital wallpaper collection.

Launching this spring, Arkiv includes fifteen different highly detailed patterns: pictorial designs of trees and chairs; buildings (in particular the Nordic Museum) and architectural elements such as doors; as well as maps, Japanese woodblock prints (highly popular in 19th Century Sweden), and digitally reproduced images of popular Sandberg designs and sketches:

Sandberg Arkiv papers via findthedetails.com Sandberg Arkiv papers via findthedetails.com Sandberg Arkiv papers via findthedetails.comFrom the top: Justus, Gunnars Stolar, and Nordiska Museet from Chaper One: Architecture, Arkiv collection, Sandberg

Sandberg Arkiv papers via findthedetails.com Sandberg Arkiv papers via findthedetails.com Sandberg Arkiv papers via findthedetails.com

From the top: Georg, Tang and Botanica from Chapter Four, Sandberg Archive, from the Arkiv collection by Sandberg

Sandberg Arkiv papers via findthedetails.com

Sandberg Arkiv papers via findthedetails.com

Top: Hiroshiges Regnskyar and below, Eishi, from Chapter Three: Japanese Woodblock prints, from the Arkiv Collection by Sandberg

My favourites are these two, with their very different but equally calming tree motifs:

Sandberg Arkiv papers via findthedetails.com

Sandberg Arkiv papers via findthedetails.com

Top: Carlsbergs Trad, and below: Eden, both from the Arkiv Collection by Sandberg

[All images, Sandberg]

The Arkiv collection launches this spring; visit Sandberg for detailed global stockists information.

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Revealed: Designs of the Year 2014: Design Museum / Makoko Floating School

Today The Design Museum  announced their nominations for the Design of the Year 2014 and one of the most innovative architecture designs has to be the Makoko Floating School, which is located in a lagoon in the heart of the city of Lagos, Nigeria. Designed by architecture / design practice NLE in collaboration with Makoko Waterfront Community (the area is described as being similar in functionality, if not looks, to Venice), the floating structure takes into account the community’s needs (for a school and social space) and the physical demands of their environment: increasing tropical rainfall and an increasingly urbanised population.

Lead by architect Kunle Adeyemi, this prototype building is sustainable, ecological and alternative: two classrooms above and a play area below ensure the available space is used thoughtfully:

find the details / makoko floating school / NLE find the details / makoko floating school / NLE find the details / Makoko floating school / NLE architecture

find the details / Makoko floating school / courtesy NLE architecturefind the details / Makoko floating school, courtesy NLE

[images courtesy of NLE, Iwan Baan]

Designs of the Year brings together 76 cutting edge, innovative and talented creations, with the best in world-wide architecture, fashion, product and digital design and more on show at the exhibition, which opens on 26 March (until 25 August) at the Design Museum on Shad Thames, London SE1. Head to the show and whilst there, vote for your favourite design; but if you can’t make it in person, the online Social Vote platform gives you a chance to have your say. On Twitter, follow #designsoftheyear and @designmuseum for current conversations.

Gehry comes to London: Battersea Power Station

For years, as buses and trains ferried me across the River Thames and back, like many Londoners I watched as the magnificent Battersea Power Station stood empty; occupying a huge, derelict wasteland site, right on the banks of the river, all the while looking like this:

Work started on the long overdue redevelopment in Autumn 2012 and the consortium have just announced today that two of the world’s leading architecture practices, Gehry Partners and Foster + Partners will be working together on the site’s regeneration, creating residential homes along what will be known as the High Street, leading to the completed Power Station looking something like this:
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[images, Battersea Power Station redevelopment consortium] 

Whilst Foster + Partners architecture is integral to the fabric of this city: it’s impossible to go far in central London without coming across some of this remarkable team’s work (think: Canary Wharf Underground station; City Hall; the Great Court at the British Museum, the Millennium Bridge just as a start), this will be the first time that a Gehry building has been built in London. Gehry Partners’ work challenges our conceptions of what form and shape a building should take, working within its chosen landscape; altering it, always thought provoking yet supremely functional, whether the practice is creating a world renowned art gallery, such as the Guggenheim in Bilbao, northern Spain (below), or a restorative space for cancer sufferers and their families (Maggie’s Centre, Dundee, two below).

Bilbao

[images, The Guardian

Take a train trip into London any day at the moment, and the skyline will be dotted with dozens of angular cranes creating new buildings: some wonderful to look at, others more… interesting (the under-construction skyscraper, so-called the Walkie-Talkie caused a stir this summer with its car-melting properties…).

I can’t wait to see how the Gehry vision, together with the Foster vision, translates into creating part of what will be a completely new area in south London to explore and discover; relax and live.

Help create the ultimate street art: painting a favela

Dutch artists Haas & Hahn are currently campaigning to raise funds for their latest art collaboration: to transform an entire favela in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with paint. Previously, they’ve worked with members of the local communities in the city to create street art on the walls and surfaces in parts of the city’s slums, and now they’re embarking on their most ambitious project yet.

Favela painting, findthedetails.com via designboom

An impression of how the finished favela will look, above, and how it looks today:

painting-an-entire-favela-in-rio-de-janeiro-designboom-03

Haas & Hahn’s first project, Boy with Kite (2006, Vila Cruzeiro), transformed this concrete neighbourhood:

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In 2010, the team worked on this colourful, ambitious project, a square in the Santa Marta community. Together with 25 locals who were trained and hired, the project took one month to complete, and has turned the area from a no-go zone to a tourist attraction:

favela painting, via findthedetails.com and designboom

favela painting via findthedetails.com and designboom favelapainting via findthedetails.com and designboom

[images: favela painting, designboom]

This latest huge, many-year project has it roots firmly in the community; from gaining approval for the painting (this means travelling through the favela, door to door), Haas & Hahn will work with local people, training them in the skills of plastering and painting, so creating neighourhood jobs alongside the creation of the public artwork. Basic human needs are also being addressed: simply by including plastering in the process, these handbuilt houses will have better longevity, temperature and moisture control. They’ll need headquarters, paint supplies, and huge amounts of funding, though their initial target is a restrained $100,000. 

Do use a click to visit Haas & Hahn’s Kickstarter and Favela Painting sites to help with the fundraising and view more of their work.

Endless Stair: new installation at Tate Modern, Sept 2013

I’m still loving the summer months and definitely not wishing the warm temperatures away, but now I’m starting to think about September, when London goes completely design crazy.

Unmissable events include interior design trade shows, from the all-encompasssing Decorex to the cutting edge 100% Design and the London Design Festival which includes, amongst other events, Tent London in the east and Chelsea Design Quarter events in the west. The festival takes place at locations throughout the city from 13 September to 10 October, and this dramatic installation is one of the highlights:

endless stair

[Endless Stair, by dRMM with AHEC, image Cityscape via London Design Week]

The Endless Stair will be located just outside the Tate Modern, making this part of London’s South Bank even more worth a visit.

Constructed from hardwood (the structure is sponsored by the American Hardwood Export Council, and created by Architects dRMM) the M.C.Escher-inspired installation will be open to walk up and along during the day and can be admired, illuminated, at night time.

September’s looking to be a busy month, design-wise: I can’t wait.

Architecture News: Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, 2013: launch week

The Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, an annual temporary structure in the heart of central London, draws architecture experts and lovers from around the world during its brief life in Kensington Gardens. The temporary nature of the building is key: its impermanence allows its architects to create awe-inspiring spaces that challenge our perception of what, in fact, makes a building.

This year the architect in question is internationally highly-respected Sou Fujimoto, and he has chosen to create a mysterious, airy, confusing, awe-inspiring space made from thousands of latticed thin steel poles: 

Serpentine-SFA-3023 01A_serpentinegallery 01B_serpentinegallery Serpentine SFA 2773 Press page Serpentine-SFA-2740 Serpentine-SFA-2773

[Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, 2013, designed by Sou Fujimoto, Image credit Iwan Bann

These poles give the pavilion an ethereal semi-trasnparent appearance both on approach and within: it was important to his design that the pavilion is set within the leafy surroundings of Kensington Gardens. Fujimoto, describing his design work: ‘A new form of environment will be created, where the natural and man-made merge…. not soley architectural nor solely natural, but a unique meeting of the two’.

Visit the pavilion until 20 October, for more information about The Serpentine Gallery click here.