Tag Archives: textiles

Don’t miss this sneak peak: Tine K Home SS15 collection

Delightful Danish homewares brand Tine K Home wins the ‘I’d like everything in my home right now, please’ award for the most covetable, original, easy-to-live-with home products. With an emphasis on natural materials and gentle colourways (gone is the Coral of previous years), the collection for Spring/Summer 2015 is filled with additions to their signature bamboo, rattan, jute and wicker furniture, baskets and rugs, with plenty more textile designs and patterns to lust after:

SS15 at Tine K Home via findthedetails.com

Handwoven rugs and runners in various shapes, textures and sizes, all crafted from jute, alongside rattan tables and baskets….

SS15 at Tine K Home via findthedetails.com

Textiles: throws; scatter cushions, outdoor cushions in slubby textures; graphic prints and geometric patterns, picked out in seaside blue or misty green….

Textiles from Tine K Home SS15 via findthedetails.com

Ceramics include vases and tableware, from urn-like vessels to faceted coloured glass tumblers that will lift an all-white table setting:

Vases from Tine K Home SS15 via findthedetails.com Tableware from Tine K Home SS15

Stationery by Tine K Home SS15 via findthedetails.comTine K SS15 product via findthedetails.com

All products above, from the new Spring/Summer collection by Tine K Home

[All images, courtesy of Tine K Home]

You’ll also find decorative lanterns that are designed to withstand the weather outdoors; new rattan armchairs; block printed stationery; handpainted tiles and a huge choice of baskets: either to store Stuff or transport it to and from the beach / car / shops….. all will be online in the New Year. Happy shopping! Jx

 

 

 

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For lovers of craft, indigo and textiles: an exhibition

If these words inspire you: textiles, crafts, traditional and inherited skills, and totally dreamy indigo blues patched over and over: then don’t miss the Boro: Threads of Life exhibition at the East Wing Galleries of Somerset House this April.

Focusing on the ancient Japanese textile tradition of Boro, which means ‘rags’ in English, the textile exhibits on display include bedcovers and clothes made by the poor, rural population of Japan who pieced and patched old pieces of discarded clothing onto and into new items, with fisherman’s jackets morphing into futon covers and on and on, as the pieces were passed down through families and generations.

With their beautiful colours, these humble works of art prompt the viewers to consider the act of ‘mending’: could it be considered an old-fashioned skill? Or, as we continue to embrace traditional crafts at home; and are more aware of the damage caused by excess waste (and/or simply feel the pinch financially) is it becoming more current to embrace repairs, so we can keep our possessions for longer?

Boro exhibition at Somerset House via findthedetails.com

Boro: Threads of Life, 2-26 April, free admission, Somerset House.

Located just off The Strand, Somerset House has to be one of the most hard-working arts and cultural venues in London; changing with the seasons, you’ll discover it hosting al fresco music gigs and giant cinema screens; a multitude of fountains; the latests frocks (it’s home to London Fashion Week) or a beautiful ice rink….

From this….

Somerset House via findthedetails.com somerset house via findthedetails.com

To this….:

Somerset house via findthedetails.com Somerset House via findthedetails.comfindthedetails.com

Somerset House via findthedetails.com

[images, Somerset House

The line up of their Summer Series of gigs (10-20 July) has just been announced: tickets go on sale this Friday 21 March, with the cinema screenings to follow later in the summer. To to learn more about the architecture, join their free guided tours (every Thursday and Saturday), taking in the Tudor and Georgian history to the modern-day, including the new Miles Stair created by Eva Jiricna. Enjoy! Jx

Geometric, graphic, colourful: Mid Century patterns, at home

Archives: reading press releases for fabric collections that include what are described as ‘archival prints’ prompts me to think about these fascinating hunting grounds for inspiration. How lucky we are (both textile designers and us ‘civilians’? ‘non-designers’? or the more prosaic ‘shoppers’?) that these historical resources are kept for us, ready to be viewed should we decide to take an interest in their subject.

The Victoria & Albert Museum has several archives which are open to the public on request, including one relating to furnishing textiles within in the Art & Design Archive. Here you’ll find records of popular fabrics sold in department stores such as Heals from the 1920s onwards:

19966-large

[Image: page from a sample album, Heals, 1922, V&A Archives]

…plus the archives of individual designers including two of my favourites, Lucienne Day and Jaqueline Groag. The current passion for Mid Century design means that 1950s fabric and wallpaper designs by luminaries such as Lucienne Day and Jacqueline Groag and their contemporary Robert Stewart are a talking point once again. The typical ’50’s design includes geometry, inventive colour contrasts and graphic, repetitive patterns: perfect for today’s decorative schemes.

Take a look at these images, reproduced from the V&A archives:

Mainly blues; some pictorial; others graphic:

jacqueline groag j graog2 13467 320766

And there are patterns in pastel shades:

311922 311919 311937 320756   320772

Plus ones in those sludgy hues, typical of the 1950’s:

311915 311879 311855 311863 311862 65471 311907

And some fresh white/green combinations which make me think of stereotypical ’50s housewives with their aprons and Formica-topped tables:

Formica kitchen

[image Picture Post/Getty, via The Guardian online] 

311890 311859 320760 311940 400534

[All print images, Memory Prints]

Whilst some 1950s fabric designs can be bought by the metre: try Glasgow’s Classic Textiles for a collection of original Lucienne Day and Robert Stewart designs  (recreated with the consent of the designers and/or their estate) sadly not all are currently in production.

But if you like any of these patterns above, it’s possible to order a paper print: the V&A’s prints are available online through Memory Prints, who reproduce these (and many more) onto high quality paper, ready for framing;  a simple way to bring a colourful, patterned piece of Mid Century artwork into your home.

To visit the V&A’s archive click here for more information.

Just in: Chic, easy-to-live-with homewares at Loaf

Just in time to catch the first tempting rays of spring sunshine (at least round these parts, the sun is trying to make an appearance after months lost….) is the new collection from Loaf.

From sturdy painted kitchen tables to soft rugs and covetable, squishy cushions, materials are natural (wood, metal, linen) and colours span a gentle palette from subtle neutrals (greys, creams, off-whites) to modern pastels.

Here’s my pick of the best:

Loaf - Bobbin bed is priced from £645 for a double low-res

Loaf - Scrunch cushions £55  low-res

A modern take on a traditional bedframe above; whilst textiles are textured; colours soft: love both the bedroom rug and generously sized feather-filled linen cushions…

Loaf - Dolly storage trolley £295 low-res Loaf - High Wire storage unit £155 and Geronimo chair £145 low-res

Bathroom pieces include metal trolleys and locker-room storage: a gentle interpretation of the currently on-trend industrial, utilitarian look

Loaf - Pantry kitchen table priced from £495 low-res

There are plenty of dining tables, plus mixable dining chairs…

Loaf - Snow Compact kitchen table is priced at £395, Geronimo metal chair is priced at £145, Cafe au Lait chair £115 low-res

Loaf - Splay kitchen table priced from £895 low-res

This delicately decorated bedlinen below is a favourite: slightly folksy, slightly Scandi, but yet (phew!) not twee: the design successfully captures the look of vintage linen:

Loaf - Saint Irene bed linen priced from £15 low-res.2

All images from Loaf

Predominantly an online business, Loaf started out in 2008 with a capsule collection of well made, well priced, chic beds and have taken it from there. Take some time out to browse their site for the full range and let me know what you think; some pieces are already there whilst others will be in stock shortly.

Furniture with a hint of summer, from our friends in Australia


Researching for a feature on garden furniture for a June issue (this is why I can never remember what month it is) I stumbled across a new brand called Bowerhouse: Australian-based, I love the quirky yet covetable rattan furniture, delicate tableware and colourful, patterned, eclectic cushions…

Bowerhouse-blacktrolley

cushions tabletop

Looking closely at the credits, I discovered the images were styled by an old friend and colleague, Jo Carmichael. I got in touch: we both started out together shooting features on (long gone) BBC’s Changing Rooms with designers Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen and Linda Barker, amongst others….

Now based in Australia, talented Jo has set up a styling agency, working with clients such as Bowerhouse to bring her signature fresh, relaxed look to the products she’s working with. You can find out more about her work here.

Bowerhouse-hero

These drum rattan stools are some of the nicest of the many I’ve seen recently: am I the only one to notice stools and poufs are everywhere right now?

I’m a newcomer to Pinterest but I have plans to create a board devoted to low stools and comfy poufs there, alongside posting here too. 

Bowerhouse mainly ships within Australia to Australian addresses but they can ship some of their products internationally: they’re happy to chat so do get in touch.

All images courtesy of Bowerhouse; styling Jo Carmichael, photography Jody D’Arcy 

Emerging Textile Designers, Sofa.com

Whether you are personally involved with textile design or simply shopping for curtain fabric in John Lewis, there’s no escaping how many fabrics there are in existence.

The constant challenge facing designers, from textile students to global companies, is to create new, original fabrics. Whilst fabric house archives are fantastic for initial inspiration, the new design must push boundaries, whether those are of colour combinations, pattern intricacy or behind-the-scenes production methods, whilst simultaneously remaining a design that we’re going to want to live alongside.

So Sofa.com‘s latest competition is great news: they’re celebrating the best emerging textile designers with their current competition to choose a fabric design that will become one of the latest upholstery fabric options for their sofas, chairs, beds and footstools.

Alongside the main judging panel, there’s also People’s Vote for shortlisted nominees, giving us the chance to vote for our favourite fabric from their final selection of 15 (plus there’s a chance to win £1000 to spend at Sofa.com)

I’ve narrowed mine down to a shortlist of four, see below…

isabel crossman

Isabel Crossman (above) was inspired by Slim Aarons’s images of the 1960s jet-set…

Natalie Raines (below) also looked to the 1960s, siting the bold yet simple Swedish designs from this period as her inspiration:

natalie raines

Sarah Victoria Roberts (below) coral-inspired fabric is a repeat pattern in easy-to-live-with modern neutral tones

sarah roberts jpeg

Emily Thompson (below) mixes the bold colours of Morocco with motifs sourced the Arts & Crafts and Art Deco movements.

emily thompson

Which ones do you prefer? You can see all the nominees and vote for your favourite directly on the Sofa.com website here

Re-home: vintage, antique and retro shopping

A couple of indulgent hours yesterday, wandering the stalls at Ardingly antiques fair in West Sussex: amazed at the curios; vintage, retro and upcycled pieces; classic well-cared-for antiques, and weird ‘rather your house than mine’ items for sale.

From indoor stands to outdoor stalls, I found French linens and 19th century spice jars (covetable, see first image); topless mannequins (less covetable for me, but possibly someone else’s cup of tea); vintage buttons, glistening silver knifes, forks and spoons; work-worn garden rakes and hoes alongside tiny glass vials; thumbed-through paperbacks and decorative, detailed metal wall lights….

french spice jarsbuttons royal china buckets

italian glass bottlesglass bottlesrulers

cropped railings wooden deer IMAG0754 IMAG0753tea chest

cropped mannequins

blue china

linen napkins

indigo throws crop

From the metre rules to the Charles & Di mugs (..who knew there were Fergie & Andrew teacups still in circulation?!), there was something for everyone….

….and it made me conscious of just how much STUFF there is out there.

I’m constantly aware of how huge the interiors industry is via my day job, and on these pages I hope simply to flag up a few gems I’ve discovered along the way: but sometimes, a trip to a fair such as Ardingly is a great way to remind ourselves that really, everything we need (and much we do not) is already in existence, ready to be re-used and re-loved.

So thumbs up to all those stallholders, who braved the mud and the January chill, driving from as far afield as Wales and France, to rig up their stands and display their finds: I’m looking forward to the next fair already….

You can find out more about the next fairs at Ardingly and at other venues around the UK here

Coincidentally, BBC’s Bargain Hunt was filming:

bargain hunt indoors

cropped bargain hunt2cropped bargain hunt

…which added a little frisson of excitement to the morning, for everyone…. who knows what they discovered?